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View Full Version : What is the best 5th wheel for fulltiming


JAB
01-17-2010, 08:47 PM
I would like to know what the best 5th wheel for full timing. A true 4 season coach
We live in Ohio and we can't travel yet but would like to full time.
Anyone have any ideas on which coach would be best to live in as far as not freezing up in the winter.
All ideas would be apreciated.

Thanks

Motor31
01-18-2010, 10:58 AM
Top brands for fulltiming are getting limited. New horizons, excell, carriage are probably at the top of the list.

Of course the majority of posts here are all about the DRV or mobile suites. I have had one of them for going on 5 years now. I would not want to be staying in Ohio in the winter in it and I had the extra insulation package installed with the dual pane windows. Several owners indicate they have no trouble but I am unimpressed with single wiper seals and then cutting notches in the largest slide seal underneath for roller clearance. That allows free air flow into the unit. I have been in temps down to the teens in this unit and it was chilly with the furnace cycling very frequently even though I stuffed rags in the air flow vents in the seal and used another foam strip for additional air blocking. I have what was then (05) the top of the line 38' rig.

There are a lot of cheerleaders for the brand but you should look over the DRV thread and see some of the recurring problems they have.

LindaH
01-18-2010, 02:24 PM
There is no RV really made for Ohio winters...I don't care if they are listed as "4 Season."

The new Excel's (2008 & later) have a -10 degree guarantee *IF* it has double pane windows. Still, staying in weather that cold requires a LOT of preparation. Are there even any RV parks open during the winter in the area you need to be?

I would suggest not buying any RV if you plan on living in it year 'round in Ohio...wait until you are in a position where you can leave during the winter.

ON EDIT: JAB, I just noticed on another post where you just bought a 2009 Suites. Are you not happy with it and looking to trade already? If not, then don't you think it's a little late for your question here?

JAB
01-18-2010, 09:13 PM
If you read my other posts then you must know I am not happy with our
2009 moblie suite and just checking to see if what other true 4 season coaches are out there.

hitchup
01-19-2010, 10:55 AM
There are very few 4-season 5ers. I think there are even fewer of any other type of RV. Most are really meant for short periods of extreme weather, that's why they come with wheels. It's much tougher when you're forced to spend the whole winter in the North and whole summer in the South. The opposite of Snowbirds.

But we've managed well in both extremes on the East Coast in our 2006 Elite Suite. But I feel our 2009 Mobile Suite is much improved over the 2006 model we had. We've been lucky with only some minor easily fixable flaws.

wingnut60
01-20-2010, 12:18 PM
JAB,
Can't help you with a better choice of brands, but I can relate a little to extended cold weather living in trailers--10 years in WY in oilfield work and living in camps for entire winters in units designed for cold weather is still not real fun. A 2-3" wall with window openings that are exposed to below-zero temps on the outside with 70 d on the inside with humidity present inside will always cause problems. You have to have a heat source to counter the cold and buildings with movable parts will always struggle to keep up with an unending source of heat loss (outside temps). The best way to live during really long cold periods is to NOT BE THERE.
Thus, the snowbird life.
I do not think anyone can make a truly comfortable portable unit to counter long periods of cold. Having spent some time in our Suites in cold weather, I would never attempt to live thru a winter in some of the places that RVers do--but maybe I'm just a wimp.
Just my thoughts.
Joe

bucky49
02-05-2012, 04:38 PM
You might look at Ne.w Horizons and leave out windows you don't need. KZ is doing some interesting things. however frost inside windows is a poblem any time you heat inside. We've waited til Jan. 2 for last 2 years to leave. Filling water tank and useing pump is a little trouble. dumping with blueboy in snow not fun. got a maserator and 100' hose this year much easier but still have to rollup wet cold hose. We left campground as they charged as much for electric as for site. only thing easier there was dumping at site.

RV Man
02-16-2017, 08:50 AM
http://www.rv.net/forum/index.cfm/fuseaction/thread/tid/28614134/gotomsg/28614408.cfm

wingnut60
02-18-2017, 11:35 AM
That is a heck of a read...but after going thru it all, not sure what I got from it.

Deb Phelps
04-04-2018, 10:32 AM
That is a heck of a read...but after going thru it all, not sure what I got from it.

i just spent my first winter full time this year in a 2008 rockwood 8265Ss signature ultra lite with a malfunctioning converter so hardly no gas heat to suppliment built in little electric fake fireplace thingy. i do use an electric heated water hose some people thought was neat as they would watch for hard freeze warnings and unplug and i did not have to worry. also some have told me that when its time to run the water not just let it drip. it must run so the sewer line stays flowing. i was not in cold long enough for that.

i wanted to be prepared but ran out of time and got caught in New Orleans in deep ice snow mix mess those three days i did not put out my slides for fear of accumulation but found out and was amazed how warm it stayed in here that way. . i also used my old house trick of hanging huge blankets or tapistries over the window and their wall. those also help keep out overzealous led light displays that have become so popular with some campers. lol like sleeping in daylight.

sorry tho the coldest i noticed regularly was only down to 20 and know growing up in northern ky . i dont think if i would care to pay to keep this place warm thru an ohio winter.

Mtntrek
08-18-2018, 03:31 AM
Still, staying in weather that cold requires a LOT of preparation. Are there even any RV parks open during the winter in the area you need to be?
I would suggest not buying any RV if you plan on living in it year 'round in Ohio...wait until you are in a position where you can leave during the winter.
ON EDIT: JAB, I just noticed on another post where you just bought a 2009 Suites. Are you not happy with it and looking to trade already? If not, then don't you think it's a little late for your question here?
JAB,
Can't help you with a better choice of brands, but I can relate a little to extended cold weather living in trailers--10 years in WY in oilfield work and living in camps for entire winters in units designed for cold weather is still not real fun. A 2-3" wall with window openings that are exposed to below-zero temps on the outside with 70 d on the inside with humidity present inside will always cause problems. You have to have a heat source to counter the cold and buildings with movable parts will always struggle to keep up with an unending source of heat loss (outside temps). The best way to live during really long cold periods is to NOT BE THERE.
Thus, the snowbird life.
I do not think anyone can make a truly comfortable portable unit to counter long periods of cold. Having spent some time in our Suites in cold weather, I would never attempt to live thru a winter in some of the places that RVers do--but maybe I'm just a wimp.
Just my thoughts.
Joe
Having spent several yrs. in northern Ohio, couple of yrs. in northern Montana in a trailer I can safely say "I ain't cowboy enough for that stuff any more."
Granted it can be done, but it isn't fun. We had a Travel Supreme which was a fairly sturdy trailer. It was purchased in WY so it was fully sealed and enclosed, plus had a sturdy marine grade clip on full underpinning. Tank and drain line heaters, and as LindH noted a good deal of other preparation(s). We also had the local co-op set a 125 Gal. "pickle" LP tank using an extension hose. A couple aux electric heaters, heat tape, etc. etc. Did I mention closed cell insulation, everywhere?
Water and waste kept flowing without much issue. You'll want to find creative ways to remove snow build up promptly, while you're on the ground. Particularly from the slide outs.

Dealing with moisture is a major issue. Even what comes from your breathing, let alone pets, cooking & bathing, etc. At -20 Deg. the windows, frames would be covered with ice (inside), we might even get patches of frost forming on the interior wall panels outlining the framing studs. Constant vigilance is require to combat Mildew!

As Wingnut mentions they put wheels under these things for a reason, to chase 70 deg. weather around.
If you're not pleased with a Suite, I doubt there is much out there that is going to perform radically better.

My old bones prefer the southwest desert of the two evils.
Best of luck.